Blog Feature
Ernest Sampera

By: Ernest Sampera on March 12th, 2015

Print/Save as PDF

New Ideas in Data Center Cooling

industry trends | colocation | data center cooling | Deepwater Desal | direct evaporative cooling

Subscribe to vXchnge Blog

Maintaining a data center can be complex process. It requires the right blend of cooling, power, space, and support. These organizations are experimenting with creative new methods of data center cooling that may someday be found in a data center near you.

Deepwater Desal

According to the Data Center Cooling Report of 2014, the market for liquid cooling and data centers is expected to grow by 40% to $2.3 billion this year. However, currently air cooling is still the most popular method of keeping data centers cool.

“Because liquid cooling can cost as much as five times that of air cooling, rack densities have to exceed the 15 kilowatt+ range before you will see any return on investment from liquid cooling, and servers aren't quite that dense”, according to Andy Patrizio with itworld.com.

The Deepwater Desal project takes sea water and converts it to fresh water using a process called desalination. An interesting facet of this project is that they are collocating a data center with the desalination plant to make both more efficient.

Desalination is a power intensive process, but Deepwater Desal plans to mitigate part of the power consumption by collocating a 150 MW data center on-site. In order to avoid plankton and other small creatures in the water, desalination plants must pull cold water from more than 100 feet below the surface. The desalination technique is less efficient with cold water, so the water needs to be heated first.

To solve this problem, Deepwater Desal will pump the cold water through the data center’s cooling heat exchanger, warming the water while cooling the data center. This will heat the water to improve the efficiency of the desalination process and cool the data center at the same time.

Direct Evaporative Cooling

You’ve probably benefited from direct evaporative cooling and not known about it. If you have ever been in a line at an outside amusement park and seen misters, you have experienced direct evaporative cooling.  This technique removes heat by evaporating water within an airstream. When the mist is blown into the hot / dry air, it evaporates and cools at the same time. This process is more efficient in dryer climates.

According to Dan Mascola with Data Center Huddle, “The system design for a data center is straight forward.  The misting system just needs to be placed in the supply airstream that will be fed into the data hall.  It basically replaces the ‘cooling coil’.  The other common cooling components (supply fans, return fans, economizers, dampers, and louvers) all remain the same.  Cooling occurs where the mist is delivered.”

Conclusion

These are just two examples of how organizations are getting creative with their cooling. As server density increases, more efficient cooling becomes important. Selecting the right data center gives you the power and cooling your company needs to grow.

Next Steps:

 

About Ernest Sampera

Ernie Sampera is the Chief Marketing Officer at vXchnge. Ernie is responsible for product marketing, communications, corporate communications and business development. Ernie brings over 26 years of marketing, sales, distribution channels, program management, strategic alliances/business development, and financial management experience to the company. Prior to joining vXchnge, Ernie was Senior Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer at Switch & Data where he was responsible for product management, marketing communications, corporate communications and business development. Prior to joining Switch & Data, Ernie served as Vice President of Channel Marketing for AT&T Business Services, where he focused on centralizing and transforming all facets of AT&T’s Sales Channel Marketing business unit. Prior to AT&T, Ernie held executive marketing and development positions with IBM, UNISYS, and the American Medical Association, where he designed, developed and deployed an open network infrastructure that positioned the AMA as a key participant in the on-line information industry.

  • Connect with Ernest Sampera